Wilderness First Responder (WFR)

SOLO’s Wilderness First Responder (WFR) course is the recognized industry standard for those who work as backcountry trip leaders, camp counselors, mountain guides, river guides, and ski patrollers.

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WHO IS THE WFR COURSE FOR?
The WFR is the perfect course for anyone working in a position of leadership in an outdoor setting or for individuals who want a high level of wilderness medical training for extended personal backcountry trips or expeditions.

 

 

Although the minimum age for WFR certification is 16, students wishing to take a WFR at the SOLO home campus must be 18-years-old unless a parent will be staying in the dorm with them. There will be no lodging costs for the parent.

 

WHAT IS TAUGHT?
The WFR is 72-80 hours long (7 to 10 days), and is a comprehensive and in-depth look at the standards and skills of dealing with: Response and Assessment, Musculoskeletal Injuries, Environmental Emergencies and Survival Skills, Soft Tissue Injuries, and Medical Emergencies. Although these appear to be the same basic topics covered in our two-day WFA course, they are covered far more extensively, and there is much more hands-on practice (See sidebar). Additional topics, such as CPR, are also included.

WHERE AND WHEN IS IT HELD?
The WFR is held around the world throughout the year. See Schedule.

HOW MUCH DOES IT COST?
The price will vary depending on the sponsor and what amenities, if any, they include. WFR courses taught at the SOLO campus cost $945 (includes class-day meals and lodging).

WHAT ABOUT DAY STUDENTS?
This is also up to the sponsoring organization. The day-student price at the SOLO campus of $795 includes all meals, but no lodging.

IS THERE AN EXAM?
There is ongoing evaluation of practical skills, and a written test.

DO I GET CERTIFIED?
Yes. Your SOLO WFR certification is good for three years.

HOW DO I RECERTIFY?
You may take either a 2-day WFR Refresher Course or a 2-day WFA course.

EDUCATIONAL/FUNCTIONAL JOB REQUIREMENTS FOR WILDERNESS MEDICAL STUDENTS AND PROVIDERS
Wilderness First Responder and Wilderness EMT are job-training programs leading to certifications. Based on the Department of Transportation’s First Responder and EMT curriculums, the WFR and WEMT programs integrate wilderness and medical training. Please read all requirements before registering for a course

DOES THE WFR COUNT AS CONTINUING EDUCATION?
The WFR typically counts as continuing education credits, although it may depend on what certification you have. Street EMTs who take the WFR course may become certified as Wilderness EMTs. Within the first year of completing a SOLO WFR, students may enroll in a SOLO WEMT Part II Module (the last two weeks of a WEMT course) to get their WEMT certification (they must pass practical and written EMT exams). Call 603-447-6711 for further information.

Course Topics

  • Anatomy & Physiology (A & P) of Respiratory System and Cardiothoracic Region
  • A & P of the Cardiovascular System
  • A & P of the Central Nervous System
  • A & P of the Gastrointestinal System and Genitourinary System
  • A & P of the Integumentary System
  • A & P of the Musculoskeletal System
  • Abdominal Pain
  • Abdominal Trauma
  • Allergic Reactions
  • Altitude-Related Injuries
  • Automated External Defibrillation (AED)
  • Bites & Stings: Animals & Plants
  • Bivouac Skills
  • Bloodborne Pathogens & Infectious Disease
  • Body Systems: Anatomy & Physiology
  • Burns
  • Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)
  • Changes in Level of Consciousness
  • Chest Pain
  • Chest Trauma
  • Cold-Related Injuries
  • Common Expedition Problems
  • CPR Considerations in the Remote Environment
  • CPR Practical Exam
  • Diabetic Emergencies
  • Dislocations & Reduction Techniques
  • Drowning-Related Injuries
  • Environmental Emergencies
  • Fractures & Splinting Techniques
  • Group Preventative Medicine
  • Head Trauma
  • Heat-Related Injuries
  • History Taking & SAMPLE
  • Improvising Litters
  • Leadership in a Backcountry
  • Emergency Lifting & Moving Techniques
  • Lightning-Related Injuries
  • Long-Term Patient Care
  • Long-Term Management of the Shock Victim
  • Long-Term Wound Care
  • Medical Emergencies
  • Medical Emergencies and Patient Assessment
  • Medicolegal Issues
  • Mock Rescue
  • Organizing the Rescue
  • PAS in the Extreme Environment
  • Patient Assessment System (PAS)
  • Poisoning
  • Primary Survey: “The First Five Minutes”
  • Prudent Heart Living
  • Role of the Wilderness First Responder
  • Secondary Survey & Vital Signs
  • Shock & Bleeding Control
  • Shortness of Breath
  • SOAPnote & Getting Help
  • Soft Tissue Injuries & Bandaging Skills
  • Spinal Cord Injury
  • Spinal Cord Injury Management
  • Splinting Practice
  • Sprains & Strains
  • Techniques of CPR & CPR Skills
  • The Anatomy of a Backcountry Crisis
  • The Ten Essentials
  • Use of Epinephrine
  • Wilderness Stabilization & Bivouac
  • Wilderness versus Urban First Responder
  • Wilderness First Responder Practical Exam
  • Wilderness First Responder Written Exam
  • What is Wilderness First Aid?
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